I am shamelessly hopeful and I hold on to the idea that some day soon, all the efforts of all the people around the world who share a passion for the environment, sustainability, biodiversity and a healthy planet, will add up to a movement of such proportions that the world will have no choice but to change its ways. I wake up every morning convinced that my small contributions will add up to this change and I try to make each effort count.
Today is Earth Overshoot day, “marking the date when humanity has exhausted nature’s budget for the year. For the rest of the year, we will maintain our ecological deficit by drawing down local resource stocks and accumulating carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. We will be operating in overshoot.”

Today is Earth Overshoot day, “marking the date when humanity has exhausted nature’s budget for the year. For the rest of the year, we will maintain our ecological deficit by drawing down local resource stocks and accumulating carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. We will be operating in overshoot.”

When faced with the thought of being eaten by a fish, however, people rarely behave rationally, which is why Recife, Brazil’s, thoughtful, humane, and effective response is such a refreshing change. After construction at a local port forced sharks to find new homes, shark attacks, some deadly, spiked. Instead of panicking, Recife caught the sharks and moved them away from the human-infested waters.

An outlook report by the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), the government agency tasked with overseeing the reef’s health, declines to mince its words. The reef is an “icon under pressure” that has suffered a dip in health since the last major analysis of its condition in 2009.

Climate change, which is causing the oceans to warm, is cited as the leading threat to the reef, followed by pollution running off the land into the sea, coastal development and direct impacts such as fishing.